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Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 - Chopin (HD)

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Composer:
Frédéric Chopin
Performer:
Frank Levy
Source:
Musopen
License:
Public Domain
Views:
8491

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Chopin composed his most popular Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 when he was about twenty.

This popular nocturne is in rounded binary form (A, A, B, A, B, A) with coda, C. The A and B sections become increasingly ornamented with each recurrence. The penultimate bar utilizes considerable rhythmic freedom, indicated by the instruction, senza tempo (without tempo). Nocturne in E-flat major opens with a legato melody, mostly played piano, containing graceful upward leaps which becomes increasingly wide as the line unfolds. This melody is heard again three times during the piece. With each repetition, it is varied by ever more elaborate decorative tones and trills. The nocturne also includes a subordinate melody, which is played with rubato.

A sonorous foundation for the melodic line is provided by the widely spaced notes in the accompaniment, connected by the damper pedal. The waltz-like accompaniment gently emphasizes the 12/8 meter, 12 beats to the measure subdivided into four groups of 3 beats each.

The nocturne is reflective in mood until it suddenly becomes passionate near the end. The new concluding melody begins softly but then ascends to a high register and is played forcefully in octaves, eventually reaching the loudest part of the piece, marked fortissimo. After a trill-like passage, the excitement subsides; the nocturne ends calmly.

Analysis

John Rink "Structural momentum and closure in Chopin's Nocturne Op 9 No 2" in Schenker Studies 2 (ed. Carl Schachter, Hedi Siegel) pp102–127 Cambridge University Press, 2006 ISBN 0-521-02832-9, ISBN 978-0-521-02832-5.

Jean-Jacques Eigeldinger "Nocturne op. 9/2, E flat major" in Chopin: pianist and teacher as seen by his pupils (ed. Jean-Jacques Eigeldinger, Roy Howat) pp77–79 Cambridge University Press, 1989 ISBN 0-521-36709-3, ISBN 978-0-521-36709-7.

Eleanor Bailie "Nocturne No. 2 in E flat major" in Chopin: a graded practical guide (Eleanor Bailie, Issue 3 of The pianist's repertoire) pp303–306 Kahn & Averill, 1998 ISBN 1-871082-67-6, ISBN 978-1-871082-67-8.

In popular culture

Bones (TV series) (2009) In season 5 episode 3, The Plain in the Prodigy: Amish boy Levi playing his audition piece; repeats as Levi's parents watch the video.

127 Hours (2010) The scene begins some years earlier in family home with Aron's younger sister rehearsing Nocturnes, Op.9, No. 2. After several days of being pinned by a boulder, Aron Ralston (James Franco), dehydrated, delusional, and believing he is going to die, reminisces his past to the bliss of Nocturne.

The Raven (2012) Alice Eve's character, Emily, plays Nocturnes Op. 9, No. 2, to an audience as her father converses with Inspector Fields.

Mad Men (2013) Played on violin by Sandy in the Season 6 premiere "The Doorway"

The Purge: Anarchy (2014) Played by a pianist at the auction.

BioShock Infinite (2013) Played on radios throughout the Finkton Docks area of Columbia.

Hetalia Axis Powers (2007) Played by Austria in Episode 06.

Parasyte -the maxim- (2014-2015) Played on its entirety in episode 15 of the anime adaptation.

In popular music

Muse's "Collateral Damage" is the same as Nocturne Op. 9 No. 2 in Eb, with slight modifications, a handful of changed notes, an added string section, children's laughter and jet fighters; this song is used as an ending to the song "United States of Eurasia".
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The text above is offered by courtesy of Wikipedia, under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Classical music piece performed by: Frank Levy

Music published by: Musopen
Music license: Public Domain

Drawing (detail) by: Elena Barbu
URL: http://www.elenabarbu.com

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